Friday, April 29, 2011

Celebrating the Mass- General Intercessions (Prayer of the Faithful)





(This lesson is in accordance with the new Roman Missal that is to be implemented on November 27, 2011.)

*Be sure to adjust this lesson to fit the needs of your students.


(Please take in consideration that I am just a Mom and I'm providing these lessons and activities to the best of my abilities. I will try to make them as accurate as possible, but I know I will make a few mistakes and it was not intentional.)



In the Prayer of the Faithful we pray for the needs of all the Church, living and dead. We ask for God’s help for all of humanity. We call on God in petition to intercede in our lives with help and guidance.

The General Instruction for the Roman Missal (the official guidebook of the Mass) says that in the Prayers of the Faithful, we exercise our priestly role in interceding for all of humanity. There is much suffering around the world and as Catholics we should never forget that it is our duty to ask for someone's behalf endlessly for all people.

It is for the priest celebrant to direct this prayer from the presider’s or celebrant’s chair. He himself begins it with a brief introduction, by which he invites the faithful to pray, and likewise he concludes it with a prayer.

The intentions are announced from the ambo or from another suitable place, by the deacon or by a cantor, a lector, or one of the lay faithful.

Usually the Prayers of the Faithful follow this order:

1. Prayers for the universal Church, the pope, and the bishops.
2. Prayers for public authorities and the salvation of the whole world.
3. Prayers for those burdened by any kind of difficulty.
4. Prayers for the needs of the local church and community.


We stand and the reader presents our needs to God. We pray silently as the reader prays aloud.

Reader: We pray to the Lord.

People: Lord, hear our prayer.

The priest summarizes our needs. We pray silently as he prays aloud.

People: Amen.



Questions:

Who reads the petitions? (The deacon or a cantor, a lector, or one of the lay faithful.)

Do we stand or sit during the Prayer of the Faithful? (Stand)

How do we answer the prayer petition at Mass? (“Lord, hear our prayer.”)



Crafts:

books.google.com- Prayer Pockets (The Encyclopedia of Bible Crafts for Children by Group Publishing, page 106)
Write your prayer intentions on popsicle sticks and put in the pocket. Each time you pray, take out one stick, pray for what is written on it, and replace in pocket. Choose another stick and pray for what is written on it.

ehow.com- Paper Plate Prayer Pocket (scroll down to this)
This craft activity can be used by young children to remember the people they are praying for. An adult can prepare for this activity by cutting one paper plate in half and then hole punch the half plate together with one whole plate. Also place two holes at the top of the paper plate for the hanger. Help the children trace their hands in a praying position on two different colors of paper. They can cut their hands out and paste them together to make praying hands. Glue the praying hands on the half paper plate. Teach the children to use an overlap lace stitch to lace the two paper plates together with a colorful yarn. A plastic needle can be used for lacing or role-masking tape around one end of the yarn for a stiff point to push through the hole. Use the colored yarn to make a loop through the two holes at the top of the whole paper plate for a hanger. With a marker, write the words (child's name) is praying for. Give each child two to four blank cards. On each card the children can draw a picture of the person they want to remember in prayer. An adult can help each child by labeling the cards. These cards are kept in the paper plate prayer pocket. The prayer pocket can be hung in the child's room. When the child prays, they can use the cards as a reminder. Parents can make notes on the card when a prayer is answered. More cards can be added to the pocket as needed.

ehow.com- Prayer Reminder Pocket (scroll down to this)
For the prayer reminder pocket, you will need two paper plates, a stapler, a hole punch, a piece of yarn, six or seven 3.5 X 5 index cards or pieces of paper, and crayons. To start, cut one of the paper plates in half. On the half piece of plate, you or the child writes "I will pray for...." Then staple the half plate to the whole plate forming a pocket. Give each child six or seven small pieces of paper or index cards. Have the child print the name of someone he can pray for on each card. Have the child decorate the prayer reminder pocket and place the cards in the pocket. Punch a hole at the top of each pocket and put the yarn through the hole so the prayer reminder pocket can be hung.

emmanuel.org- Remember This!
A cute craft to remember your prayer intentions.

littleblots.com- Prayer Chain Craft
This is a great way to encourage participation and pray for each other’s needs.

catholicfamilyvignettes.com- Our Prayer Board



These activities below are free, however they can only to be used for classroom and personal use. They may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted. All graphics/images/clipart etc. used on these activities are not my own and are from various internet sources.



Lord, hear our prayer activity sheet (for younger students)- Have the students trace the letters. Inside the heart the students will draw the needs they see around us in our community or their own personal desires.

Lord, hear our prayer (for older students)- Have the students draw a large heart on their paper. Below the heart have the students write: “Lord, hear our prayer.” (You can write this on the board for the students to copy.) Inside the heart the students will write the needs they see around us in our community or their own personal desires.

*The students can also cut out pictures from magazines and newspapers, or use pictures from the internet and make a collage of the needs they see around us in our community or their own personal desires on a piece of poster board. Under the collage have the students write “Lord, hear our prayer.” Or at the top of a bulletin board put the words, “Lord, hear our prayer.” Students can write on index cards or draw pictures of their prayer intentions and put on the bulletin board.



Class Discussion:

Discuss with the students what they think are the current needs of the world and the local community. Have the students keep the following series of intentions in mind:

a) for the needs of the Church;
b) for public authorities and the salvation of the whole world;
c) for those burdened by any kind of difficulty;
d) for the local community.

(You might ask: Which one is more important? Why is it more important? Which one is a need of your own personal desires? Etc.)



Have the students draw a Venn Diagram. Have them write the similarities and the differences between what the class thinks the general intercessions should be and what they personally think they should be. (Write details that tell how they are different in the outer circles. Write details that tell how they are alike where the circles overlap.) Discuss.

teachnology.com- Create your own Venn Diagram



Journal Writing:

Praying for others is not only a privilege, but a responsibility and a duty arising from baptism. Have the students journal why we pray for others and when and why they have done this.





Monday, April 25, 2011

The Power of Words



"It's not what you say, but how you say it."

This makes the point better than ever.
Have a look (filmed in royal Exchange Square Glasgow).






Friday, April 22, 2011

Celebrating the Mass Lesson- Profession of Faith





(This lesson is in accordance with the new Roman Missal that is to be implemented on November 27, 2011.)

*Be sure to adjust this lesson to fit the needs of your students.


(Please take in consideration that I am just a Mom and I'm providing these lessons and activities to the best of my abilities. I will try to make them as accurate as possible, but I know I will make a few mistakes and it was not intentional.)



The Nicene Creed, our profession of faith, is an important part of the Mass. The Creed is recited at the beginning of the Liturgy of the Eucharist just after the Gospel reading and homily. In between the two main components of the mass is a statement of beliefs Christians have expressed for 16 centuries.

Creed is from the Latin credo which means “I believe.” It is a summarization of the faith that Christians profess. Jesus brought important information to everyone about God and His message of salvation. Our acceptance of this information is faith. A Creed sums up the truths that God gave us and allows us to profess our beliefs so that we can acknowledge the truths by faith.

The Council of Nicaea met in 325 A.D. in a town in Turkey named Nicaea. Here the bishops composed a Creed to clearly state the beliefs of the Church and to reject many of the false understandings that were being taught. This prayer is called the Nicene Creed and it is a summary of what Christians truly believe. The Nicene Creed states the truths that the Church had been teaching since the time of the apostles.

The Creed is divided into three parts. The beginning speaks of the first Divine Person, God the Father, and the wonderful work of creation. The first thing our Creed tells us about God Himself is that He is the Father Almighty. Here we affirm that there is only one God and He is the creator of everything.

The middle part speaks of the second Divine Person, Jesus Christ, and the mystery of His Redemption for mankind. Beginning with stating that Jesus is indeed God, this is the longest section where Jesus’ role in the salvation process is defined. Here, Jesus’ life story is told and how He came to save mankind.

The final part speaks of the third Divine Person, the Holy Spirit, who is the source of our sanctification. Again, there is emphasis that the Holy Spirit is also God. The Holy Spirit is the part of the Trinity that is able to dwell within us so that we can have the gift of the grace of God.

Another important component of the Creed is the definition of the four marks of the Church. Here, another truth of Christ’s true Church is defined for us. It states that the Church that Jesus established for all time must be one, holy, catholic (universal), and apostolic or having its authority derived from the apostles.

The Nicene Creed is a summary of the principle truths of our God given to us by the early Church and has been passed on to every generation. As we profess and reaffirm the common faith that is the foundation of Christianity, we today share in the same truths as did the earliest Christians (Scaravilli, 2010).


During the Profession of Faith we stand and declare what we believe in. In the Profession of Faith we state our belief in God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit- the Holy Trinity. By reciting the summation of the Church’s belief, we declare ourselves both full members of the Church and faithful disciples of our Lord.

The Creed is to be sung or said by the priest together with the people on Sundays and Solemnities. It may be said also at particular celebrations of a more solemn character.

If it is sung, it is begun by the priest or, if this is appropriate, by a cantor or by the choir. It is sung, however, either by all together or by the people alternating with the choir.

If not sung, it is to be recited by all together or by two parts of the assembly responding one to the other.


There are two new words in the Nicene Creed: Consubstantial and Incarnate

God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made, consubstantial with the Father;

Consubstantial means that God the Father and God the Son are made of the same substance.


For us men and for our salvation he came down from heaven, and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary, and became man.

Incarnate means that the Son of God became a human being.



I believe in one God,
the Father almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all things visible and invisible.

I believe in one Lord Jesus Christ,
the Only Begotten Son of God,
born of the Father before all ages.
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made, consubstantial with the Father;
through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation
he came down from heaven,
(bow during this part) and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the Virgin Mary, and became man.

For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate,
he suffered death and was buried,
and rose again on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures.
He ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory
to judge the living and the dead
and his kingdom will have no end.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son,
who with the Father and the Son is adored and glorified,
who has spoken through the prophets.

I believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.
I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins
and I look forward to the resurrection of the dead
and the life of the world to come. Amen.



Questions:

Do we stand or sit during the Nicene Creed? (Stand)

Is the Nicene Creed sung or said? (Either)

What does credo mean? (“I believe”)

Where was most of the Nicene Creed written? (It was written long ago in a town in Turkey named Nicaea.)

What do we say we believe in the first part of the creed? (That we believe in one God.)

What do we say we believe in the second part of the creed? (Belief in Jesus is still belief in one God.)

In the third part of the creed what do we declare? (Our belief in the Holy Spirit and the Catholic Church.)

What does consubstantial mean? (Made of the same substance.)

What does incarnate mean? (To make human.)



Activities:

catholicmom.com- Catechist Resources for Roman Missal, 3rd Edition
Creed- lesson with Worksheet (page 2), The Creed Crossword (page 3)

looktohimandberadiant.blogspot.com- The Creed & Notebooking

smp.org- The Trinity: Unpacking the Nicene Creed – PowerPoint
This PowerPoint is part of the Living in Christ Series. The Trinitarian themes of the Nicene Creed are defined, unpacked and explored by breaking the prayer down and reflecting on smaller statements of faith.

tes.com- The Nicene Creed
A PowerPoint based on the core Christian beliefs and a useful introduction into the history of Christianity. Linking the Creed to the Trinity in Christianity and the historical context of the Christian beliefs.

teacherspayteachers.com- Nicene Creed Prayer Activity Packet

looktohimandberadiant.com- The Creed-Words to Know
Here are a few ideas for getting the meaning of those important words through to your students.

looktohimandberadiant.com- The Creed + Tetris
This is an easy activity that can be used to help memorize groups of text, in this case, the Nicene Creed.



Crafts:

catholicicing.blogspot.com- Catholic Trinity Craft

looktohimandberadiant.blogspot.com- We Are the Church Craft (highlighting the Four Marks of the Church found at the end of the Nicene Creed)

catholicicing.blogspot.com- Nicene Creed Craft (Be sure to change this to say: I believe in one God, etc.)

looktohimandberadiant.com- I Believe Mobile







Make Nicene Craft from catholicicing.blogspot.com according to directions. Have students trace the beginning of the Nicene Creed: "I believe in one God, the Father almighty, maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible." (Printed out on tracing handwriting sheet.) Glue prayer on a piece of construction paper. Glue the bottom part of the hand on the back of the prayer with the hand showing above prayer.

Nicene Creed Tracing Handwriting Sheet- Students write their name on the top line. Students then trace the handwriting sheet and follow directions above.



Games:

superteachertools.us- Nicene Jeopardy Instant Jeopardy Review is designed for live play with up to ten individuals or teams. Teams choose a question, then try to give the best answer.

superteachertools.us- Instant Jeopardy Review is designed for live play with up to ten individuals or teams. Teams choose a question, then try to give the best answer. Scoring is built in for each team.

catechistjourney.loyolapress.com- We are going to do this review using a Jeopardy-like game that I found online last year at http://ccdgames.com/Jeorpardy.php. This site provides the game in a Powerpoint format so that it can be projected on a screen as a gameboard! I found that it was possible to simply save one of the games as a Powerpoint file and then change the categories, questions, and answers to suit your needs. As a result, I’ve put together 4 “rounds” which you are welcome to use or adapt as needed. (Scroll down to this.)

loyolapress.com- The Nicene Creed Game
Students help each other learn the Nicene Creed while playing a game.


These games below are from nashvilleras.com- More than 100 Missions Bible Memory Games and Other Activities

I Am a Verse- Divide the Nicene Creed into parts equal to the number of children. Print each part on separate sheet of paper or index card. Jumble paper/cards and give one to each child. Holding the paper/card in front, each child lines up in proper sequence. Call out your part. Repeat until the Nicene Creed is memorized.

Illustrated Verse- Ask children to draw pictures of words in the Nicene Creed that help them remember the word. Put the drawings together repeating the words using the visual clues. Continue until all have learned the Nicene Creed.

Missing Words- Write the Nicene Creed on a chalk or white board omitting key words. Give each student a card with a key word missing from the Nicene Creed. Ask students to place their word cards in the proper place as they say the Nicene Creed. Shuffle cards and repeat until all have learned the Nicene Creed.

Photograph a Verse- Write words to the Nicene Creed on separate sheets of construction paper. Take pictures of each child holding a line to the Nicene Creed. Children then use the pictures to arrange the words to the Nicene Creed in proper order. Tape to poster board.

Verse Chain- Print lines of the Nicene Creed on separate strips of paper. Give each child one strip. After repeating the Nicene Creed several times with the children, ask them to assemble the chain by putting the words of the Nicene Creed in order. Staple the chain together.




These activities below are free, however they can only to be used for classroom and personal use. They may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted.


Nicene Creed- Cut out strips and glue strips of the Nicene Creed in the proper order on a piece of construction paper. (For younger students you can do this together as a group activity.) You can also play this as a game by dividing the class into teams and give each team the strips of the Nicene Creed. See which team can put it in the proper order the fastest.







The Nicene Creed- The objective is to be the first player to get all four of his or her color pawns from his or her START location to his or her HOME space. Players must do this by answering questions about the Nicene Creed and rolling the die.



Lessons:

Celebrating the Mass Lesson- Profession of Faith Lesson, questions, and activities.

4catholiceducators.com- Lesson Title: "I believe..."

wpengine.netdna-cdn.com- What Is The Creed? (lesson with activities)



Puzzles:

armoredpenguin.com- Nicene Creed (word search)

wordsearchfun.com- Nicene Creed (word search)

whenwecrosswords.com- Nicene Creed (crossword)

wordmint.com- Nicene Creed (crossword)

edubakery.com- Nicene Creed (crossword)

Nicene Creed- (crossword)
For younger students you can do this together on the board.

edubakery.com- Nicene Creed (word scramble)



Worksheets:

teacherspayteachers.com- Fill in the Blanks (FREE)
This is a great way to get your students in Religious Education to start memorizing the new Nicene Creed. It is a one page worksheet that has specific words left out of the prayer. The students pick from the word bank to add in the correct words. You can also photo copy the word bank out to make it harder for older students.

icsaamenia.org- Compare and Contrast the Creeds (page 13)





Friday, April 15, 2011

Celebrating the Mass Lesson- The Gospel





(This lesson is in accordance with the new Roman Missal that is to be implemented on November 27, 2011.)

*Be sure to adjust this lesson to fit the needs of your students.


(Please take in consideration that I am just a Mom and I'm providing these lessons and activities to the best of my abilities. I will try to make them as accurate as possible, but I know I will make a few mistakes and it was not intentional.)



Gospel means “good news” and the reading is taken from the New Testament. During the Gospel we stand and listen to the priest read from the Book of the Gospels.

If incense is used, the priest puts some into the thurible. After this, the deacon who is to proclaim the Gospel, bowing profoundly before the priest, asks for a blessing, saying in a low voice: Your blessing, Father.

The priest says in a low voice:

May the Lord be in your heart and on your lips
that you may proclaim his Gospel worthily and well,
in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.

The deacon signs himself with the Sign of the Cross and replies: Amen.

If, however, a deacon is not present, the priest, bowing before the altar, says quietly:

Cleanse my heart and my lips, almighty God,
that I may worthily proclaim your holy Gospel.


The Deacon, or the Priest, then proceeds to the ambo, accompanied, if appropriate, by ministers with incense and candles. There he says:

The Lord be with you.

People: And with your spirit.

Priest: A reading from the holy Gospel according to N.

*At the same time, he makes the Sign of the Cross on the book and on his forehead, lips, and breast. The people make a fist with their right hand and with our thumb we make a small Sign of the Cross on our forehead, on our lips and over our heart and silently pray, “God be in my mind, on my lips, and in my heart.”)

People: Glory to you, O Lord.


Then the deacon, or the priest, incenses the book, if incense is used, and proclaims the Gospel.

At the end of the Gospel, the Deacon, or the Priest, acclaims: The Gospel of the Lord.

All reply: Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.

Then he kisses the book, saying quietly: Through the words of the Gospel may our sins be wiped away.

Then follows the homily, which is to be preached by a priest or deacon. The homily may even be given by a Bishop or a priest who is present at the celebration but cannot concelebrate. During the homily the people sit. This is when the priest shares special thoughts and ideas with us to help us connect the gospel to our own life experiences.

After the homily a brief period of silence is appropriately observed.



Questions:

What does Gospel mean? (Good News)

Do we stand or sit during the Gospel? (Stand)

What book is the Gospel read from? (The Book of the Gospels)

Is the Gospel from the Old or New Testament? (New)

Who reads the Gospel? (A deacon or a priest.)

Where do we cross ourselves three times? (Once on the forehead, once on our lips, and once over our heart.)

When we cross ourselves three times, what do we say? (“God be in my mind, on my lips, and in my heart.”)

Who does the homily? (A deacon or a priest.)

Do we stand or sit during the homily? (Sit)

What is a homily? (This is when the priest shares special thoughts and ideas with us to help us connect the gospel to our own life experiences.)



Craft/Activity:


Lesson 11: Preparing for the Gospel- Children Discover the Mass by Mary Doefler Dall
An inventive way to help children learn to make the Sign of the Cross on our forehead, on our lips and over our heart and silently pray, “God be in my mind, on my lips, and in my heart.” (Craft/Activity directions and template on pages 59 – 60).



These activities below are free, however they can only to be used for classroom and personal use. They may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted. All graphics/images/clipart etc. used on these activities are not my own and are from various internet sources.


Game:

Stand Up, Sit Down Game

Directions: Have the students stand in front of their chairs with plenty of room in front of them. Say to the students: Let’s review what you should do during the Liturgy of the Word Sequence. When I say a part of the Liturgy of the Word, you must stand or sit like you would do in Mass.

During the First Reading, what are you supposed to do? (Sit)

During the Responsorial Psalm (we join in a prayer that is read or sung) what do we do? (Sit)

During the Second Reading, what are you supposed to do? (Sit)

When we sing the Gospel Acclamation (“Alleluia”), what are you supposed to do? (Stand)

During the Gospel what do you do? (Stand)

What do we do during the Homily? (Sit)

*If the students do well, mix up the sequence above and see how well they do.



Worksheet:

The Gospel- Circle the best available answer for each of the following.





Friday, April 8, 2011

Celebrating the Mass Lesson- Liturgy of the Word Sequence





(This lesson is in accordance with the new Roman Missal that is to be implemented on November 27, 2011.)

*Be sure to adjust this lesson to fit the needs of your students.


(Please take in consideration that I am just a Mom and I'm providing these lessons and activities to the best of my abilities. I will try to make them as accurate as possible, but I know I will make a few mistakes and it was not intentional.)



There is a specific order to the readings done at Mass. The people sit and the Lector stands at the ambo and reads the first reading from the Lectionary. The Lector can either be a man or woman. Sometimes teens are Lectors. The first reading is from the Old Testament (except during the Easter Season) which was written before Jesus was born and relates to the Gospel Reading of the day.

To indicate the end of the reading, the Lector acclaims: “The Word of the Lord.”

All reply: “Thanks be to God.”


After the first reading comes the Responsorial Psalm, which is an important part of the Liturgy of the Word and holds great liturgical and pastoral importance, because it fosters meditation on the word of God. The Responsorial Psalm should correspond to each reading and should, as a rule, be taken from the Lectionary.

The Book of Psalms is from the Old Testament. It is a collection of inspired poems, hymns, and prayers. It is preferred that the Responsorial Psalm be sung, at least as far as the people's response is concerned. The Cantor sings the verses of the Psalm from the ambo or another suitable place. The entire congregation remains seated and listens but, as a rule, takes part by singing the response, except when the Psalm is sung straight through without a response.


Then the Lector reads the second reading from the ambo. The second reading is from the New Testament which deal with the coming of Jesus and the establishment of God’s New Covenant with humanity through Jesus, God’s Son.

To indicate the end of the reading, the Lector acclaims: “The Word of the Lord.”

All reply: “Thanks be to God.”


This is followed by the Gospel Acclamation (Alleluia) or another chant laid down by the rubrics, as the liturgical time requires.

After the Second Reading we are about to hear the Gospel proclaimed. First, the Gospel Acclamation, the Alleluia, it is usually sung and this can be done in a number of ways. Alleluia is a word of praise and happiness and it is part of our preparation for the reading of the Gospel. As we stand, the priest or deacon moves toward the altar to take the Book of the Gospels. The minister who will read the Gospel is joined by two candle bearers called “acolytes” (a Greek word that means “attendants”), and another acolyte who bears incense (in Masses during which incense is being used). As we sing the Alleluia, the Book of the Gospels is held aloft and carried in procession to the ambo.

During the Lenten season the Alleluia is not sung or said. The Alleluia is replaced with another verse that gives praise to the Lord. The Book of the Gospels is still carried in solemn procession during the season of Lent, but the absence of the Alleluia alerts us to a time of meditation. After the Alleluia we continue to stand for the Gospel.



Questions:

What do we call the person who reads the first and second reading? (The Lector.)

Which book is the first and second reading read from? (The Lectionary.)

Where do the first readings usually come from in the Bible? (The Old Testament.)

How do we respond to the readings after the Lector says, “The Word of the Lord.” (“Thanks be to God.”)

The Book of Psalms is from the Old or New Testament? (Old)

Do we stand or sit during the first and second reading? (Sit)

Is the Lector a man or a woman? (Either)

Where do the second readings come from in the Bible? (The New Testament.)

Do we stand during the Gospel Acclamation (Alleluia)? (Yes)

What season is the Gospel Acclamation (Alleluia) not sung or said? (During Lent.)

Do we stand or sit during the Gospel? (Stand)



Lesson:

thereligionteacher.com- Liturgy of the Word Lesson Plan
Lesson plan consists of objectives, learning activities, worksheets, lecture, centers, assessment, etc.



Craft:


Lesson 9: Liturgy of the Word Sequence- Children Discover the Mass by Mary Doefler Dall
Color pieces then cut them out. On a long strip of colored paper glue the pieces in the correct order. (Craft directions and template on page 55 & 56.)



Game:

This game below is free, however it can only to be used for classroom and personal use. It may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted. All graphics/images/clipart etc. used on this game are not my own and are from various internet sources.




Liturgy of the Word Sequence Card Game- For 2 to 4 players print out on card stock at least 2 copies of each page (for more players print more copies). Shuffle cards and the Dealer deals out 4 cards to each player. Dealer puts cards down in the middle of the table, turns over the top card, and places it beside the deck. From the cards in his hand the Dealer must place the next card in the sequence of the Liturgy of the Word on top of the card facing up. If he does not have the proper card, he must draw a card from the deck. Play moves clockwise. If the deck runs out, play moves to the next player clockwise and game continues. The first player to run out of cards wins.





Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Liturgy of the Word Sequence Card Game



This game below is free, however it can only to be used for classroom and personal use. It may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted. All graphics/images/clipart etc. used on this game are not my own and are from various internet sources.



Liturgy of the Word Sequence Card Game

For 2 to 4 players print out at least 2 copies of each page (for more players print more copies). Shuffle cards and the Dealer deals out 4 cards to each player. Dealer puts cards down in the middle of the table, turns over the top card, and places it beside the deck. From the cards in his hand the Dealer must place the next card in the sequence of the Liturgy of the Word on top of the card facing up. If he does not have the proper card, he must draw a card from the deck. Play moves clockwise. If the deck runs out, play moves to the next player clockwise and game continues. The first player to run out of cards wins.




First Reading Cards

Responsorial Psalm Cards

Second Reading Cards

Gospel Acclamation Cards

Gospel Reading Cards






Friday, April 1, 2011

Celebrating the Mass Lesson- Gloria





(This lesson is in accordance with the new Roman Missal that is to be implemented on November 27, 2011.)

*Be sure to adjust this lesson to fit the needs of your students.


(Please take in consideration that I am just a Mom and I'm providing these lessons and activities to the best of my abilities. I will try to make them as accurate as possible, but I know I will make a few mistakes and it was not intentional.)



Gloria is a song, sometimes it is read. It is a joyous acclamation in which we praise God and recognize the Father as our heavenly King and Jesus as the Lamb of God. We do not sing or recite the Gloria during Sundays in Advent or Lent.

Gloria is a prayer that is actually an ancient hymn with three parts. The first part is the song that the shepherds heard sung by a heavenly choir of angels at the birth of Jesus. The second part praises God by recalling all of His attributes. The third part prays to Jesus, asking Him to save us from our sins.


We continue to stand during Gloria as it is sung or it is read.

Glory to God in the highest,
and on earth peace to people of good will.

We praise you,
we bless you,
we adore you,
we glorify you,
we give you thanks for your great glory,
Lord God, heavenly King,
O God, almighty Father.

Lord Jesus Christ, Only Begotten Son,
Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father,
you take away the sins of the world,
have mercy on us;
you take away the sins of the world,
receive our prayer;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father,
have mercy on us.
For you alone are the Holy One,
you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High,
Jesus Christ,
with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father.

Amen.



When this hymn is concluded, the priest, with hands joined, says: “Let us pray.”

And all pray in silence with the priest for a moment.

Then the priest, with hands extended, says the Collect prayer, at the end of which the people acclaim: “Amen.”



Questions:

Are we standing or sitting during Gloria? (Standing)

Is Gloria sung or said? (Either)

Long ago, who heard the angels sing part of this song at Jesus’ birth? (The shepherds)

The second part of this song praises whom? (God)

The third part of this song prays to Jesus asking Him to do what? (To save us from our sins.)

What times of the year is this prayer not said or sung at Mass? (During Sundays in Advent and Lent.)



Activities:

catholicmom.com- Catechist Resources for Roman Missal, 3rd Edition
Gloria- lesson with Puzzle (page 2), Stand Up Angel Craft (page 3)



Crafts:

Introduce craft: Who died on the cross so our sins would be forgiven?



catholicicing.blogspot.com- Printable Resurrection Set
Only make Jesus on the Cross which is on page 1. Directions on how to make craft is posted.
*Be sure to have students cut out the cross on the dotted lines so the cross will stick out.

christiancrafters.com- Mosaic Cross
Easy cross necklace/magnet that all kids can make.

christiancrafters.com- Colors of Christ Cross (neat tip on the bottom for little ones)

orientaltrading.com- Jelly Bean Prayer Cross Craft Kit

homeschooled-kids.com- Jelly Bean Prayer Craft (scroll down to this)

thriftyfun.com- Jelly Bean Prayer Magnet
Cute magnet using painted dry beans.

rainbowcastle.org- The Jelly Bean Prayer (scroll down to Craft Idea)
Fill an empty jar with jelly beans and put the Jelly Bean Prayer on the outside of the jar.

kinderart.com- Jelly Bean Sweet Jar (be sure to put the Jelly Bean Prayer on the outside of the jar).



Games:

christiancrafters.com- 2 Games: Clean Heart & Repent (scroll down for these)



The following games are from nashvilleras.com- More than 100 Missions Bible Memory Games and Other Activities

A May Zing- Display Gloria on a chalk or white board. Children read Gloria together several times. Erase Gloria. Begin writing it again on the board, but purposely incorrectly. As soon as a child detects an error, he or she calls out, “Zing!” Erase and begin again. Continue going through Gloria several times before you write it correctly.

Bible Verse Hopscotch- Using masking tape or chalk, mark off a hopscotch grid in an open area. Write the words of Gloria on a card. Place a card in each of the squares of the grid. Children will take turns completing the hopscotch grid until all have learned Gloria.

Blank Verse- On a chalk or white board write Gloria, leaving blanks for words you intentionally leave out. List all the words omitted on the board in a random fashion. Ask one child to go and write a word in the proper blank. Repeat until Gloria is completed. This can be done several times until all children have the verse memorized.

Cut and Glue a Verse- Write Gloria on construction paper and tape it on the wall. They are to find and cut out letters to the words of the verse from magazines and glue them under the words on the wall. Say Gloria when all have been found. (You can assign a few students to each do a line to avoid confusion.)

Domino a Verse- Write words to Gloria on the backs of several dominoes. Lay them face down on a table. Children turn them face up and arrange them in correct order to form Gloria. Children say Gloria correctly. After that they can “domino Gloria” by arranging standing dominoes to fall.




These games below are free, however they can only to be used for classroom and personal use. They may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted.





Jelly Bean Prayer File Folder Game- The objective of the game is to collect the most Jelly Bean jar cards by answering questions about Jesus and get to FINISH.






Gloria File Folder Game is a simple board game with the straightforward objective of racing the player's 4 pawns from start to finish with dice throws. Similar to the brand-name board "Sorry!" marketed by Parker Brothers, Gloria (Ludo) shares similarities with the game Pachisi (or Parcheesi), which in turn originated in 6th century India.




Gloria File Folder Game- Players race against other players in advancing his/her 4 playing pawns from start to finish by answering questions about Gloria and with successful die rolls. Each player has four specifically-designated finishing positions. The winner is the first player to successfully rest his 4 pawns on his designated finishing space. This game can be played individually or in teams.



Worksheet:

This worksheet below is free, however it can only to be used for classroom and personal use. It may not be published on any websites or other electronic media, or distributed in newsletters, bulletins, or any other form or sold for profit. Reproduction or retransmission of any materials, in whole or in part, in any manner, is not permitted.


Gloria (fill in the blanks)- Fill in the blanks with the words from below. (With younger students you can do this together on the board.)